Category Archives: scribbles

3-week rule

It really does work – The three week rule!

As a child I read somewhere that the humans take roughly three weeks to get ‘used to’ things.

e.g. I recently moved to the U.S. for a long-term(1 or 2 years) assignment. Initially I felt like any other red-blooded Indian. I want to go home. I am getting the hell out of here as soon as possible. But, then on the 24th day of my stay, something changed. In a moment, I was like, this place is not so bad. I think I will be able to manage a year or two here and it’s going to be child’s play. From that second on everything seemed so different, so nice, so wonderful. Then I said to myself, the 3 week thing really does work.

I have seen many other instances of this rule in my life as well as those of others. As for any other rule, there are exceptions to this one too. But, then it does work.

Doesn’t it?

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Life in the fast Lane

Recently I came across the following fact in an article on discover.com:

“More people commit suicide in New York City than are murdered.”

The instant I read that, I said to myself, “So much for life in the fast lane”. I have always struggled to understand what that phrase means. “Fast lane” towards where? I even dared to ask out loud the same question to some of the super achievers that I have had the fortune of interacting with. The unequivocal reponse that I got was, “Towards fame and fortune”. If I were to answer that question, I would say, “Towards stress, ill-health and misery.”

Don’t get me wrong. I am not the guy who drives at 40mph on a 6-lane freeway. I just don’t see the point of trying to go at 100 mph all the time when you very well know that the odds of you making it are one in a gazillion.

Riding in the fast late for a while is a smart thing. Living in the fast lane is foolish. But hey, that’s just what I think.Recently I came across the following fact in an article on discover.com:

“More people commit suicide in New York City than are murdered.”

The instant I read that, I said to myself, “So much for life in the fast lane”. I have always struggled to understand what that phrase means. “Fast lane” towards where? I even dared to ask out loud the same question to some of the super achievers that I have had the fortune of interacting with. The unequivocal reponse that I got was, “Towards fame and fortune”. If I were to answer that question, I would say, “Towards stress, ill-health and misery.”

Don’t get me wrong. I am not the guy who drives at 40mph on a 6-lane freeway. I just don’t see the point of trying to go at 100 mph all the time when you very well know that the odds of you making it are one in a gazillion.

Riding in the fast late for a while is a smart thing. Living in the fast lane is foolish. But hey, that’s just what I think.

Easy benchmarking

An easy albeit crude way of finding out how your company is doing as compared to its competitors, is using www.alexa.com to find out how many visitors frequent your company’s web-site.

In the information economy where the internet rules the roost, I think how many people actually are interested in knowing about your company is a pretty decent indicator on how its doing.

A lesson from the pirate

Yesterday I saw the “Pirates of the Caribbean: At world’s end”. I loved it. It was nice. I would say, it was better than the first two.

The one thing that I learnt from Jack Sparrow yesterday was how to live a carefree life. Well, not that we can or should live as carefree a life as our pirate friend but to an extent we should be doing that. Being able to, to some extent, adopt the “nothing to lose” attitude is the key to being able to live in the present without pondering about the past and fretting about the future.

Make sense?

Greater good of outsourcing

I am reading the ‘The World is Flat’ by Thomas Friedman. In the first chapter, talking about call center operators and the fact that they are more that willing to make sacrifices such as having to adapt a western name and ascent at work and having to work oddball hours, Friedman says,

“And needless to say, it is much easier and more satisfying for them to work hard in Bangalore then to pack up and try and make a new start in America. In the flat world they can stay in India, make a decent salary, and not have to be away from families, friends food and culture. At the end of the day, these jobs actually allow them to be more Indian.”

That last statement of his very aptly explains the “why” of those sacrifices. It made me realise something. Outsourcing seems to be doing much more than “economic good” for India. It is letting Indians be Indians and to my mind there is nothing more than that a country could ask for.

Does it really matter?

All of us know time has far greater power than money. Despite that, we give negligible thought when it comes to spending time as compared to the thought we give to spending money.

So far, wasting time was not catastrophic but 21st century and onwards it will be. The successful man will not be he who knows how to use his money but it will be he who makes the best use of his time. That’s reality.

So, for everything I spend time on, I have started asking myself, Does It Really Matter? I would suggest you do to.